What To Expect When Visiting The Giraffe Centre In Nairobi? (2021)

Giraffes at the lower deck of the Giraffe Centre

Giraffes are such incredible animals and it was amazing getting close and personal with them. Apart from the Giraffe centre being a great photo opportunity, it’s a cheaper alternative to staying at the popular Giraffe Manor. The Giraffe Centre was so enjoyable that I ended up spending almost three hours there. My favourite giraffe was Stacey as she was the most gentle and funny too. I witnessed her spray water on another person which was very cheeky. If you ever find yourself in Nairobi, don’t miss visiting the Giraffe Centre!

The giraffe centre is located in Lang’ata, approximately 15 km from the centre of Nairobi, Kenya. The centre is open from 9 am to 5 pm every day including weekends and public holidays. At the giraffe centre, you’ll get the chance to feed Rothschild Giraffes. Rothschild Giraffes are a subspecies of the giraffe found only in the grasslands of East Africa.

A picture of Giraffe looking straight ahead at the camera

How much is the entrance fee and how to book?

It’s important to note that you can only book this experience online due to covid measures. There are booking slots of up to 1 hour. Payment can be made with Mpesa, visa or MasterCard. 

The cost varies depending on if you are a resident of Kenya, a non-resident, adult or a child.

Cost (Up to date from the Giraffe Centre Website):

Non-Resident Adult = 1500 kes (£10 / Approx $15)

Non-Resident Child = 750 kes

Resident Adult = 400 kes

Resident Child = 200 kes

What to expect at the Giraffe Centre?

Before entering the Giraffe Centre, you must wear your masks. Upon arriving at the desk, you will need to present your e-mail with a QR code from your pre-paid ticket.  You’ll be handed a small bowl of pellets, and then you can proceed to the lower deck to feed the giraffes. 

Covid measures at the Giraffe Centre
Covid measures at the Giraffe Centre.

On the site, there will always be staff to assist you and ensure you feed the giraffes safely and do not get too close to them.  The upper deck of the Giraffe centre is currently closed for renovations, but the lower deck remains open. There is an information centre on-site where you can attend talks about giraffe conservation, and about initiatives that the centre is currently involved with. Visit a gift shop called Daisy Zoovenir Shop if you want to pick up some souvenirs. You can also sit down, relax and enjoy some tea at the tea house. All proceeds from the sales at the gift shop and tea house go towards conservation efforts.

A selfie of a Black female solo traveller in front of a Giraffe

Tips to enjoy your experience:

  1. Come as early as possible to avoid crowds. After 11 am it gets quite busy.
  2. Always stand in front of the giraffes and avoid standing too close to the side of the giraffe’s to prevent getting head-butted. 
    Warning sign to watch out for giraffe headbutts.
    Warning sign to watch out for giraffe headbutts.
  3. There are stations to wash your hands and bathrooms so don’t worry about occasionally getting giraffe saliva on your hands haha.
  4. After you spend some time with the giraffes, you can go for a stroll through the 1.5km nature trail. The nature trail is available to guests at no extra cost. You might see warthogs, antelopes, and a variety of bird species on the trail.""</p

What conservation work is being done at the Giraffe Centre?

The Giraffe Centre is the creation of the African Fund for Endangered Wildlife (A.F.E.W. Kenya), a Kenyan non-profit organisation. Their main purpose is to educate Kenyan schoolchildren and youth about their country’s wildlife and environment and to give locals and international visitors a chance to view the world’s tallest animal, Giraffes.

When you visit the Giraffe Centre or donate, your contribution goes towards:

  • Conservation support and raising Rothschild Giraffes – Among the Giraffe Center’s main conservation tasks is breeding the endangered Rothschild Giraffe. The calves are released in the wild when they reach the age of two to three years old, when they are independently capable of surviving. More than 40 giraffes have been released into safe game parks and conservancies across Kenya. 

  • Conservation education – This involves school visits and ecology trips, which includes children learning environmental themes such as sustainable development, forest conservation, wetlands protection and waste management. Publishing conservation books, posters and literature. Demonstration projects such as compost manure production, tree nursery are implemented in schools and communities to solve an environmental problem. 

90% of funds collected from entrance fees and sales from the gift shop and tea house go towards the conservation work being done at the giraffe centre.

 

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Would you visit the Giraffe centre?

pintrest pin for a guide to visiting giraffe centre

 

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